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20120801
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Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
sunday night. >> this is going to be a good show. for nasa and j.p.l. this is knowing they've done all they can z landing on mars is not easy. in previous tries we've suck said seeded only owe% of the time. and this will have a world wide audience. if there is curiosity then it probably began with this. the now famous seven minutes of terror video depicting a landing. >> there is something difficult we know. and this is anxious moment. whether or not i had a video to look at. >> the lead scientist had only minutes to speak with us today. his space craft and mars moved closer together. the target is a crater where water once flowed. and there is an opportunity to read the planet's history. >> succession is layered giving us a recorded history of probably what represent hundreds of millions of years of time, maybe a billion years of time when the planet may have been more like earth had been. >> it will not be looking for light but signs of it. clues indicating conditions once existed on mars and there is not only scientific but philosophical. >> if there is light next door that awakens
on planet earth who was watching. let's take a look at that moment in jpl when they got their confirmation. >> touchdown confirmed. we are safe on mars. >> [cheering] >> we are wheels down on mars. >> by the time they relayed the information curiosity had been on mars for seven minutes. look at the mix of triumph, relief and then unbridled joy as curiosity sent back the first images of the surface. thumbnails as they call them from each corner of the rover showing how sits and how it fares. it is the best possible outcome sharing this experience which is one reason why they came to watch at nasa aimes tonight. >> in a sometimes cynical, sometimes idealistic world it took an attempted landing on a different one, mars, to bring all of these people back to the aimes research center. >> this is eight and a half months of waiting at the end of a long mission. >> there are not too many mars landings in my lifetime, so i am glad to see one. >> it took the curiosity rover from space to the surface of mars. from an entry feet of 13 kilometers per second to 0 in ser harrowing minutes. a one-ton rove
of terror. >> thank you. anyone who hasn't seen the video, google it. it is put out by jpl in pasadena. we have this robot hurdling through space at 13,000 miles per hour. it weighs one ton. it is the size of a mini cooper. the pathfinder was a microwave. this is big. headed through space. the atmosphere of mars is very thin. it is not as soft and gentle an entry as it would be here on earth. within seven minutes, it needs to go from 13,000 miles per hour to zero and land gently and this elegant sequence of events need to happen perfectly to land successfully. it involves parachutes and rockets. pretty marvelous feat of engineering. a lot has been invested. i talked to scott harber today. he used to be the lead researcher. he said the mood is of confidence, but tension. a blanket of tension over the confidence. we tested all these tools as much as we can. it is time to get on up there and give it a try. it is really high stakes. >> will this actually scoop things up and get it back to us or it will collect data? >> it will collect data and transmit back to us. how we will find out if it is
:00 p.m. the event includes presentations and then from 10:00 to midnight, live broadcast from jpl laboratory. we'll have live coverage of the journey tomorrow at 6:00 and 11:00 expm get more information on her web site. under "see it on tv". >> alan: we have some rain out there? >> leigh: sprinkles. more or less a mist and drizzle. especially near the coast, and i want to show you the cumulus buildup, along the highest peaks. this is from the mt. tamalpais camera. you can see a little break 0 in the action, little heating taking place but it's then the subtropical moisture, live doppler 7hd picking that up nicely, and we have reports of a few showers. we're going to take you up north bay between santa rosa, towards pet human -- petaluma, a brief shower here, moving off towards the north and west. right here near shilo road, we have this -- this is a false return but what is not a false return i right here, this is moving to the north and east around napa. you'll see a little wet pavement. if this cell holds together -- they've been moving quickly from south to north and been falli
who was watching. let's take a look at that moment in jpl when they got their confirmation. >> touchdown confirmed. we are safe on mars. >> [cheering] >> we are wheels down on mars. >> by the time they relayed the information curiosity had been on mars for seven minutes. look at the mix of triumph, relief and then unbridled joy as curiosity sent back the first images of the surface. thumbnails as they call them from each corner of the rover showing how sits and how it fares. it is the best possible outcome sharing this experience which is one reason why they came to watch at nasa aimes tonight. >> in a sometimes cynical, sometimes idealistic world it took an attempted landing on a different one, mars, to bring all of these people back to the aimes research center. >> this is eight and a half months of waiting at the end of a long mission. >> there are not too many mars landings in my lifetime, so i am glad to see one. >> it took the curiosity rover from space to the surface of mars. from an entry feet of 13 kilometers per second to 0 in ser harrowing minutes. a one-ton rove
for missions to mars is only about one in three. here 59 jpl they've gone 13 for 18. that's a 7: -- .720 batting average in the red planet league. even so this time the nerves are racheted higher along with the stakes. >> facing budget pressure from the white house, nasa has reduced funding for mars missions and pulled out of plans to partner with the european space agency to stage an elaborate series of missions to mars to bring a rock sample back to earth. much to the dismay of the mars science community. jim bell is president of the planetary society and also on the spirit opportunity and curiosity imaging teams. >> it's frustrating to try and understand why the administration or congress would want to stop what so many americans are incredibly proud of and has been so successful. >> one of their big apply loos is democratic congressman adam shift who represents the california district that is home to the jet propulsion lab. >> if we step back from mars now at a time when we are tantalizingly close to finding the building blocks of life on mars, it may be decades before we go back. >>
billion or more a piece have largely paid back the money. can you name some of the major banks? guest: jpl morgan, citibank -- j.p. morgan, citibank, goldman sachs paid back tarp. initially, $125 billion was given to the largest banks and it quickly paid back. host: and banks worth less than $10 billion a piece, and moneys outstanding versus what they paid back. what is it about the smaller banks giving them a harder time? guest: a lot of the smaller banks are not as healthy as the big banks. they also don't have easy access to the capital market, so it is harder for them to go out and raise capital to pay it back. host: here is a piece that you wrote for bloomberg a couple of weeks ago. the u.s. treasury department said it started selling stakes today -- first of all, why get out of it? why is of the treasury department trying to extricate itself from these banks? guest: hutras reece says it was never intended to be a lifelong shareholder of banks, so it was natural they would eventually get out. i think they are realistic probably will not do with this year. and probably will continue in
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)

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